Summer Session 2022

Sweet Briar College is offering 33 courses this summer for degree seeking and non-degree seeking students.  Many of these courses have no prerequisites and are open to any interested person from upper level high school students to more mature individuals that want to continue their learning. Other courses have prerequisites as noted or require a short audition as noted below. If there are any concerns about whether you meet the prerequisites please contact Tony Ryals (tryals@sbc.edu). 

Courses will run from May 23 to July 1.   The registration deadline is May 14.

How to sign up

Please use this link to register:

We will contact you as needed to gather more information.


Policies

  • Courses are offered to any person for academic credit or not for credit (audit option).
  • Courses are offered to all genders.
  • All summer courses are offered completely online using synchronous instruction, asynchronous instruction, or a combination of both. Each individual will be required to have a computer and stable internet access to support online work and streaming of live or recorded lectures.
  • It is recommended that one take no more than 2 courses.
  • Courses will run from May 23 to July 1. Exams and final work will be given the week of July 5 and grades due by July 8.
  • Registration is ongoing and must be in by May 14. Depending on enrollments late registrations may be accepted through May 20. Courses that do not meet minimum enrollment will be canceled.  
  • The last day to drop a course is May 25.  
  • The last day to withdraw from a course is June 17.  For those enrolled for credit, a grade of W will be given for withdrawals. 
  • All courses will be graded. Students can elect to take the course P/CR/NC. Requests for that grading option must be submitted by May 27. 
  • The academic policies of Sweet Briar as detailed in the 2021-2022 college catalog will apply to these courses.

Cost

 $525 per credit hour, $215 per credit hour for no-credit (audit option). Due May 23.

Refunds:  Full refund, less a $50 processing fee will be given prior to the start of the course (May 23).  After May 23, the following refund policy applies

  • 90% of tuition plus $50 processing fee until May 30
  • 50% of tuition plus $50 processing fee until June 6
  • 25% of tuition plus $50 processing fee until June 13

Courses

ARAS 216 – Magic and Witchcraft in the Ancient World

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor: Erin Pitt
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:30

This course explores the evidence – material, textual, and visual – for magic and witchcraft in the Ancient World, focusing in particular on the practices of Greece and Rome, with comparative course studies drawn from Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Biblical texts.  By considering these practices as a form of non-normative belief expression, particularly as compared to state sanctioned religious practices in Greece and Rome, the course examines the relationship between such practices and the cultures that produced them, suggesting that practices framed as non-normative by textual sources reflect ongoing shifts in perspectives on gender, power, and otherness with ramifications echoing through political, social, and economic institutions, as well as through more normative religious systems.


 

BIOL 112 – Introduction to Cells

  • 4 credits
  • Instructor: Kala Bonner
  • Modality: synchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  TBD

Prerequisite: BIOL 111. An introduction to cell biology, including the chemistry of biological macromolecules, cell structure, function, and reproduction. Additional topics include genetic engineering, viruses and cancer, and the cellular basis of immunity.


 

BIOL 117 – The Biology of Superheroes

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  John Morrissey
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  TBD

This course examines the biological concepts and phenomena, along with a bit of physics and chemistry, that seemingly provide the powers and abilities of the fictional heroes that compose our modern-day mythology. How would we have to change Clark Kent’s eyes to give Superman x-ray vision? Could Spider-Man’s synthetic webbing really withstand the forces that he regularly applies? Which aspects of Ant-Man, the Lizard, or the Vulture are legitimate, and which are utter fantasy? These and many additional questions will be examined during this course. This course may not be counted toward the major or minor in biology. 


BIOL 209 – Marine Biology

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  John Morrissey
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  TBD

Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and BIOL 112. A survey of marine organisms and their adaptations to seawater chemistry, seafloor geology, and waves, tides, and currents. Our comprehensive survey of marine microbes, fungi, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates will then enable us to discuss the ecology of specialized marine communities, such as kelp forests, polar seas, the open ocean, intertidal zones, seagrass beds, coral reefs, and the deep sea.


CORE 120 – The Mindful Writer

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor: Rebekah Ricksecker
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times: Mondays & Wednesdays 4:00 – 6:00

A workshop-based writing course that helps students become confident and effective readers and writers. Using the New Yorker magazine as the primary text – each student will have an individual ten-week subscription – students will learn to read carefully, identify the style and structure of individual pieces, from profiles to reviews to political and cultural commentary, and write several pieces of their own, practicing a range of rhetorical methods while also conducting research, crafting persuasive arguments, and producing multiple drafts through careful and sustained revision. 


CORE 130 – Women and Gender in the World

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Kimberly Morse-Jones
  • Modality:  Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00 – 11:00

A multidisciplinary study of the social, cultural, and political issues that influence women in societies across the world. The course introduces theoretical perspectives and social contexts for the diverse challenges that confront contemporary women.


CORE 160 – STEM in Society

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor: Caleb Brown
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday for 1.5 hours

This course is designed to empower students to develop evidence-based opinions, and make informed decisions about societal issues related to science and technology. After becoming familiar with the scientific method, the basic methodology common to all good scientific research, students will learn to distinguish between legitimate and bogus results by thinking clearly and critically about the claims of scientists and charlatans alike. 


CORE 180 – Dollars and Sense

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Sandy Glass
  • Modality:  Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  Tuesday & Thursday 5:00 – 7:00

Women leaders in all walks of life need a solid understanding of financial topics. Three major categories will be covered: first, broad economic concepts, which will provide a foundational understanding; second, organizational financial mechanisms; and finally, financial literacy for the individual (e.g., understanding credit and personal investing). Each category will include hands-on learning. 


BUSN 127 – Accounting I:  Financial Accounting

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Sandy Glass
  • ModalityCombination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  Tuesday & Thursday 5:00 – 7:00

An examination of the accounting cycle; the recording, posting, adjusting, and closing of accounting data for a sole proprietor service and merchandising business, to include internal controls, receivables and payables, inventories, depreciation, and payroll.  Emphasis is on the use of accounting data for decision making.  Students will be required to master the automation of financial statement and pro forma development using interactive spreadsheets.


BUSN 227 – Accounting II:  Managerial Accounting

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Sandy Glass
  • ModalityCombination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  Tuesday & Thursday 5:00 – 7:00

Prerequisite: BUSN 127. This second course in accounting builds on the concepts, principles, procedures, and analytic methods taught in the introductory course and extends to accounting for partnerships and corporations. Focus is on financial statements and interpretation of financial information. Students will also be required to build interactive spreadsheet to enable a business to evaluate various business scenarios and cost structures automatically. 


CHEM 131 – General Chemistry

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times:  TBD

Prerequisite: A math skills placement, please contact Dr. Ryals.  Co-requisite: CHEM 141. This course is an introduction to chemical principles and it is open to students having appropriate backgrounds in science and mathematics. Areas of emphasis include chemical equations and reactions, stoichiometry, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility equilibria, electronic structure of atoms, periodic relationships, molecular structure and bonding, intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Applications of modern chemistry are discussed whenever appropriate and are explored in the associated laboratory course.


CHEM 141 – General Chemistry Laboratory

  • 1 Credit
  • Instructor: Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 131. An introduction to experimental chemistry. Laboratory modules emphasize investigation of the chemistry in everyday life and introduce modern analytical techniques. A nominal lab fee may be required for this course. 


CHEM 231 – Organic Chemistry

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 141 with grades of C- or better.  Co-requisite: CHEM 233. A study of the chief classes of carbon compounds, including their syntheses and the mechanisms of their reactions. The methods for determining reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. 


CHEM 233 – Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

  • 1 credit
  • Instructor:  Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting times: TBD

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 141.  Co-requisite: CHEM 231. Experiments are designed to introduce students to the techniques of separation, purification, and synthesis of organic compounds. Techniques for studying reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, and the use of literature of chemistry are also covered. A nominal laboratory fee may be required for this course.


CHEM 232 – Organic Chemistry II

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisites: CHEM 231 and CHEM 233.  Co-requisite: CHEM 234. A continuation of CHEM 231.


CHEM 234 – Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

  • 1 credit
  • Instructor:  Caleb Brown
  • Modality: asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisites: CHEM 231 and CHEM 233.  Co-requisite: CHEM 232. A continuation of CHEM 233. A nominal laboratory fee may be required for this course.


ENGR 125 – Introduction to Computer Science and Data Science

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bryan Kuhr
  • Modality: synchronous instruction
  • Meeting times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday 9:30 – 11:00

An introduction to computer programming using Python, including the basic ideas of algorithmic problem solving, structured programming, and object-oriented design. Topics include software engineering concepts, problem solving, programming control structures, class definition and instantiation fundamentals, file input/output, and elementary data processing. Students use real world datasets to learn why and how data influences decision-making across a variety of areas, including social sciences and economics


MATH 123 – Calculus I

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Limits, differentiation and integration of polynomials and trigonometric functions. Applications of calculus including graphing, related rates and max-min problems.


MATH 124 – Calculus II

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite: MATH 123. Applications of calculus to area and volume problems, the exponential and logarithmic functions, techniques of integration, sequences and series of real numbers


MATH 205 – Applied Statistics

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

An introduction to data analysis and statistics. Descriptive statistics, random variables and their distributions, independence, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and linear regression. Applications in science, social sciences and economics. Not open to students who have earned credit for MATH 106.


MATH 218 – Discrete Mathematics

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

While continuous mathematics is the language of calculus and requires the use of real numbers, discrete mathematics is the language of formal logic, graph theory, and computer science, and it can be characterized by the use of integers. This course is an introduction to the tools and methods used in discrete mathematics. Topics include sets, logic, recursion and mathematical induction, trees, graphs, methods of proof, counting and probability, and relations and digraphs, with applications to computer science.


MATH 223 – Calculus III

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite: MATH 124. Topics in analytic geometry in two- and three-dimensional euclidean space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, gradients, and multiple integration. 


MATH 232 – Linear Algebra

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite: MATH 124. A study of linear systems, matrices and matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, and linear transformations; includes applications to Euclidean n-dimensional spaces as well as theory of abstract vector spaces.


MATH 303 – Probability

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite: MATH 223. Permutations and combinations, discrete and continuous distributions of several random variables, independence, and conditional probability, expectation, variance, the Central Limit Theorem. Offered alternate years.


MATH 323 – Sequences and Series

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

A rigorous study of sequences and series of real numbers and functions, developed from the axioms of the real number system and elementary point set theory.


MATH 333 – Algebraic Structures

  • 3 credit
  • Instructor:  Bob Hingtgen
  • Modality: Combination of synchronous and asynchronous instruction
  • Meeting Times: TBD

A rigorous study of abstract algebraic structures, focusing primarily on group theory.


MUSC 185 – Applied Voice

  • 2 credits
  • Instructor: Kay Rooney
  • Modality: TBD
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite: Audition may be required.  Please contact Tony Ryals.  A weekly, 50-minute private lesson. An applied music fee will be assessed for this course. Music scholarships are available to defray part of the cost. Once a scholarship has been awarded, it will continue to be awarded whenever the student enrolls in the course, as long as funds are available and the student shows sufficient progress. All students enrolled in applied music are required to perform in a departmental recital or before a faculty jury, usually near the end of the academic term. Exceptions may be made for those students who have performed a solo recital or program of equivalent difficulty.


MUSC 191 – Applied Strings

  • 2 credits
  • Instructor:  Kay Rooney
  • Modality: TBD
  • Meeting Times: TBD

Prerequisite:  Audition may be required.  Please contact Tony Ryals.  A weekly, 50-minute private lesson. An applied music fee will be assessed for this course. Music scholarships are available to defray part of the cost. Once a scholarship has been awarded, it will continue to be awarded whenever the student enrolls in the course, as long as funds are available and the student shows sufficient progress. All students enrolled in applied music are required to perform in a departmental recital or before a faculty jury, usually near the end of the academic term. Exceptions may be made for those students who have performed a solo recital or program of equivalent difficulty.


POLS 159 – Introduction to American Government

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Josh Wheeler
  • Modality:  TBD
  • Meeting times:  TBD

Introduces the study of American government and politics using political science methods.  Includes examination of political analysis models, authority systems, American political culture, U.S. constitutional origins, federalism, political parties, and elections.  Also studies the influence of media and public opinion, while focusing on the president, Congress, and judiciary.  Explores how courts interpret civil rights and liberties.


POLS 224 – First Amendment and Hate Speech

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor: Josh Wheeler
  • Modality: TBD
  • Meeting times: TBD

The constitutional right of free speech is not “free” in the sense that there is no cost.  In fact, Americans pay a tremendous price by having to endure the expression of ideas and images that many find deeply offensive.  With a special focus on the events that arose out of the protests that occurred at the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, and the violent protests that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017, this course will explore the question of whether we pay too high a price for free speech by protecting the expression racist, sexist, xenophobic, and other forms of hate speech even when such speech has the potential to encourage lawless behavior in others.


POLS 329 – Topics in Political Science: Judicial Politics

  • 3 credits
  • Instructor:  Josh Wheeler
  • Modality:  TBD
  • Meeting times:  TBD

Judicial Politics will examine the relationship of politics and the American judicial system; specifically, the politics involved in becoming a judge in both federal and state courts. Special focus will be on appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court. We will also examine highly controversial court decisions such as Bush v. Gore and Citizens United v. the Federal Election Commission on the public perception of the judiciary’s impartiality. Finally, the course will explore constitutional decisions on issues such as abortion, gay rights, and national security that some believe were a response to public opinion rather than a reasoned application of constitution principles.