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'In Sweet Remembrance'

Playwrite Tearrance A. Chisholm

 

'In Sweet Remembrance': A Play by Tearrance A. Chisholm

Commissioned by Endstation Theatre Company, Sweet Briar and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts,
“In Sweet Remembrance” is a tribute to the significant role of the black community throughout the College’s history.

Playwright Tearrance A. Chisholm, who lives in Washington, D.C., has spent the past four summers researching
Sweet Briar’s cultural and historical importance, resulting in an original play that, according to Endstation,“explores the landscape of its past, discovers the contours of its present and realizes its future.”

"In Sweet Remembrance" will be produced as a part of the College’s 2014 freshmen orientation week and is open to the public.  The cost is $18 for adults, $16 for seniors, and $10 for students. 
 
Please note: The performances are FREE for Sweet Briar College faculty, staff, and students with a valid SBC ID, but tickets must be reserved through the Endstation box office
 
Performances: 
 
Wednesday, Aug, 27, 7:30 p.m. (post-show discussion)
Friday, Aug. 29, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 30, 7:30 p.m. (post-show discussion)
Sunday, Aug. 31, 2 p.m. (post-show discussion)

All performances are in Murchison Lane Auditorium.

To purchase tickets, vist Endstation's website.

The alumnae office will sponsor pre-show tours of Sweet Briar House and the slave cabin at 6 p.m. Saturday and 12:30 p.m. Sunday. There is no charge for the tours and registration isn't required. For more information, contact Katie Jo Hamre, assistant director of alumnae and student engagement, at kjhamre@sbc.edu or (434) 381-6168.


Excerpts from the play

Tribute Must Be Paid

Jessamine Chapman Williams, a real home economics professor at Sweet Briar, wrote a letter on March 17, 1953, calling for recognition of the College’s African-American employees. In this scene, Jessamine is writing the letter while her maid, Miss Muriel, in a fictional account by the playwright, gives testimony and a different perspective.

 

 

 

 

 

A Midnight Tour of the Cemetery

In a late night tour of the campus and her new surroundings, Professor Diana Singer finds herself beckoned to the College’s old burial grounds and slave cemetery. Confronted by a “thousand nameless voices,” Diana learns she must take her place in the history of Sweet Briar and take part in the legacy of its people.