Welcome

Why study engineering?

Engineers change the world. We design and create practical solutions to some of society’s most crucial challenges. We think in different ways to invent and build things that improve people’s lives. Across industries, engineers are fortunate to work with inspiring people to produce new and better theories and products.

Why engineering at Sweet Briar?

The Sweet Briar College Margaret Jones Wyllie ’45 Engineering Program is an interdisciplinary program bridging mechanical and electrical engineering. The engineering science program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Students thrive in our small, connected engineering community. They work closely with faculty, developing relationships that can last for decades. Classes are interactive — at Sweet Briar, abstract topics in textbooks are turned into hands-on lab experiences. Students work beside engineering faculty on important research and industrial consulting programs.

ABET AccreditationIn our challenging yet supportive environment, women become engineers and leaders who make change happen in the U.S. and throughout the world. Students and faculty have traveled to Brazil to deliver student-designed assistive devices. Students and faculty also designed a water supply system for a small village in Guatemala.

All Sweet Briar engineering majors gain valuable exposure to industry through guaranteed co-op experiences. We team with Region 2000, Central Virginia’s Economic Development Partnership, to provide opportunities and have developed partnerships with regional companies to facilitate co-op experiences.

What can you do with an engineering major?

Engineering StudentsOur interdisciplinary program prepares students to work effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Our graduates, prepared to approach problems at the systems-level, are ready for industry or graduate school.

Sweet Briar engineering graduates work in a variety of industries. They can be found at leading companies and organizations, including: AREVA, BWX Technologies, Glad Manufacturing, the U.S. Navy, General Atomics, IBM and AMTI. Many have studied in a wide range of graduate engineering programs, including: Dartmouth, University of Virginia, Johns Hopkins and Virginia Tech, to name a few.


The engineering program is part of the engineering, computer science and physics department. Information about the other programs in the department can be found on the following websites: